How can you treat a urinary tract infection? Dr. Payal Bhandari explains in the final video in our series

December 16, 2016 Uqora Staff

In our final video of the series, Dr. Payal Bhandari tells us about UTI treatment options. She explains ways to support your body's natural defense system, as well as ways to potentially avoid antibiotics.

Want to review the other content in the series? Watch all the videos here.

Hello!  I am Dr. Payal Bhandari, an integrative family physician practicing in San Francisco, CA since 2005. Urinary tract infections are an extremely common problem among women; causing more doctor’s visits per year than everything but the common cold.

In my last video I explained how you can avoid a urinary tract infection—now let’s talk about what you can do once you’ve have a UTI.

In today’s medical system it is extremely common for antibiotics to be started the moment a person has any symptoms of a UTI. The problem is antibiotics are not benign medications and are associated with many side effects, most importantly hurting the immune system and increasing a person’s risk for future infections, like recurrent UTI’s.

There’s a handful of ways you can support your natural defenses against urinary tract infections. During the 1st 24 hours of developing UTI symptoms you can consider trying the following:

  • Take the over-the-counter supplement, Uqora, twice a day.
  • For non-pregnant women, take Uva Usi natural supplement every 2 to 3 hours during the day for a total of 6 doses.   
  • Apply the tincture Barberry root bark with a clean cotton ball to the urethra every day until the symptoms resolve.
  • During the time you are trying to fight off a bladder infection make sure to avoid sugar, processed and pre-packaged ready-made items, caffeine, alcohol, dairy products, red meat, fish, and other animal protein, corn, and wheat.
  • If the UTI symptoms do not improve within 24 hour, it is critical that you contact your doctor.  At this point antibiotics may be the first line treatment. The duration of antibiotic use may vary from 1 to 7 days depending on the severity of the UTI and a person’s medical history.  


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