UTI Prevention

If you get UTIs, you probably want to know what you can do to prevent UTIs instead of just relying on treatment. There are some simple UTI prevention habits you can incorporate, and some effective products that have been clinically demonstrated to help prevent UTIs (and no, we're not talking about cranberry).

If you get a UTI, you need antibiotics to treat the infection. Some doctors also recommend antibiotics prophylactically (meaning, used regularly to prevent UTIs, not just treat UTIs). While prophylactic antibiotics can help with UTI prevention, it can cause a lot of other issues. Overusing antibiotics can lead to other infections, like yeast infections, and increase your risk of developing a resistance to antibiotics in the long run. Outside of antibiotics, popular wisdom has often indicated cranberry juice and extracts as a good option for UTI prevention. Research supporting cranberry juice and extracts is conflicting, and in 2016 the American Medical Association denounced cranberry as an effective solution for UTI prevention. The New York Times coined these findings "the cranberry myth." 

So what can you do to prevent UTIs? There are a number of habits you can incorporate to reduce your risk of UTIs, highlighted below. A lot of women who struggle with UTIs have already incorporated these best practices (staying hydrated, urinating after intercourse, etc). Still, some of us are just more prone to UTIs no matter what we do. Here at Uqora, the UTI prevention company, we get that. At Uqora, we make effective prevention products with ingredients found in nature for women who want to get ahead of UTIs. In addition to healthy habits, you can drink Uqora Target directly after high-risk activities (like sex or exercise) to flush out UTI-causing bacteria and stay UTI-free.

Bladder infection v UTI
+ How to prevent a UTI
There are a handful of ways you can help your body boost its natural defenses against urinary tract infections:
  • Stay well hydrated. Urination is your body’s best natural defense against UTIs, and the better hydrated you are the better your body can fend for itself.
  • Urinate immediately and fully — don’t hold it in. Go to the bathroom regularly and flush bad bacteria out of your urinary tract. Make sure you completely emptied your bladder and clean from front to back.
  • Avoid baths if you’re especially prone to UTIs and opt for showers instead.
  • Urinate soon after having sex to flush out bacteria.
  • Wear cotton underwear for maximum breathability.
  • Evaluate your birth control options if you’re suffering from repeat UTIs. Diaphragms, unlubricated condoms or spermicidal jelly for contraception may increase the risk of developing a UTI.
  • Try to avoid or dramatically limit consuming items which increase your bladder pH. This includes sugar, processed and pre-packaged ready-made items, caffeine, alcohol, dairy products, red meat and other animal protein, fish, lots of corn, wheat, and potatoes.
  • If you are post-menopausal, speak with your physician about how your hormonal changes could be impacting your risk of UTIs. Some physicians recommend estrogen supplements to help.
  • Use Uqora daily - Uqora’s products prevent UTIs caused by new bacteria, and old bacteria with Uqora Target and Uqora Control. Target is a UTI prevention drink-mixwhich uses a multi-layered approach to flush out bacteria, and Control is a UTI prevention capsule to take daily and provide a bacterial defense against old bacteria hiding in your urinary tract. 
+ How does Uqora Target (the UTI prevention drink mix) work?

Uqora Target is an effective way to prevent UTIs caused by specific activities. Uqora Target's ingredients provide a multi-layered defense against UTIs. The ingredients bind with UTI-causing bacteria, increase urinary flow with a gentle diuretic, boost immune system function, and alkalize the urine. Drink Uqora Target directly after activities that tend to trigger your UTIs (like sex, for example) to flush out UTI-causing bacteria and prevent UTIs.

 

If you don't always know what causes your UTIs, consider Uqora Control. Uqora Control is a daily capsule that helps break down biofilm, the tool bacteria use to hide, later causing recurring UTIs that seem to come out of nowhere. You can learn more about both Uqora Target and Uqora Control here.

+ Can antibiotics help with UTI prevention?
Physicians often recommend using antibiotics to prevent UTIs, not just treat them. It is worth noting that while prophylactic antibiotics do help prevent UTIs, using antibiotics to prevent UTIs can have serious drawbacks.
For one, while antibiotics do strip our body of the bad bacteria that can cause UTIs, they also strip our body of the good bacteria we need to keep a balanced vagina. Without good bacteria, yeast infections can more easily set in.
Additionally, antibiotics don't always kill all the bacteria. When some bacteria are able to survive antibiotics, bacteria develop resistance to antibiotics. As the resistant bacteria reproduce, they give rise to new populations that are similarly resistant. Pretty soon, that bacteria could have given rise to entire generations of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
So while antibiotics are certainly a tempting UTI prevention method for someone who repeatedly suffers from UTIs, it is worth noting that overusing antibiotics comes with potential risk and side effects.
+ UTI and underwear: can your underwear cause UTIs?
Certain fabrics can trap moisture, making it easier for bacteria to thrive. As a general rule of thumb, go for underwear made of breathable fabrics. Generally, cotton is the most breathable, and also has moisture wicking properties. When your genital area is kept dry, bacteria are less likely to grow, which lessens the risk of a UTI. Choose underwear that doesn’t fit too tight in order to avoid ingrown hairs and to keep from trapping moisture and bacteria.
+ Can you give someone a UTI?
No, UTIs are not contagious. UTIs are not a sexually transmitted disease (STD) or infection (STI). It is possible to transfer bacteria between you and your partner, which ultimately can travel up the urinary tract, replicate, and cause a UTI. However, it’s not accurate to say that a UTI can be transmitted; you cannot pass on your UTI.
+ What should I drink for UTI prevention?
You should always drink plenty of water. Staying well hydrated is your body’s best mechanical defense against UTIs, enabling you to flush bacteria out of your urinary tract frequently, preventing bacteria from adhering to your urinary tract. However, some of us are just more prone to UTIs, and simply staying hydrated isn’t enough to stay ahead of UTIs.
If your UTIs are caused by specific activities (like sex, or exercise) consider Uqora Target, our UTI prevention drink mix. Uqora Target fights new bacteria introduced during certain activities. Uqora Target binds with UTI-causing bacteria and increases urinary flow to flush them out of the urinary tract, all while boosting your immune system. Drink it directly after activities that increase your risk of UTIs, like sex.
+ Birth control and UTIs: are they related?
Diaphragms and spermicides have been shown to increase the risk of UTIs. Spermicide has been shown to be harmful to “good bacteria” in the vagina. By killing off this bacteria, spermicide, therefore, makes the vagina more susceptible to the growth of e.coli, the bacteria which cause urinary tract infections. Make sure to check the ingredients list on the condoms that you’re using, and if they contain spermicide-throw them out!
Additionally, while research has been limited, some studies have shown that recurrent UTIs become more common in women who have recently inserted an IUD.

Prevent UTIs with Uqora

Try Uqora—the effective way to prevent UTIs.  Drink Uqora Target to flush out UTI-causing bacteria.  Take Uqora Control daily to break down biofilm, which can cause recurring UTIs.

You guys... this stuff is a life saver.

"I suffered from CHRONIC UTIs and have had some pretty serious repercussions from taking mass amounts of antibiotics. I have not had a UTI since I started taking uqora. I drink it after things that are my triggers (sex in particular) and it stops it in it’s tracks!"
Lacey, Uqora customer

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Learn More About Preventing UTIs

Want to learn more about UTI Prevention?  Urinary tract infections are a huge inconvenience and quite literally, very painful. Even if you’ve only had one or two UTIs in your life, you know that you want to get to the doctor right away to deal with it. Although UTIs can be treated with antibiotics, if you use antibiotics too frequently, it can lead to an immune resistance, making it more difficult to treat the next UTI. Getting ahead of UTIs with these UTI prevention tips can help you avoid this painful infection.

Boost Your Body’s Defense Against a UTI

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure is very true when it comes to UTIs. There are many ways to prevent a UTI that don’t take much effort:
Stay hydrated to let your body naturally defend itself against UTIs. Urine naturally flushes bad bacteria out of your urinary tract.

  • Go to bathroom when you need to go. Don’t hold urine in. Completely empty your bladder and wipe front to back.
  • Urinate soon after having sex to help flush out the bacteria.
  • Wear cotton underwear to allow breathability. Synthetic fabrics trap moisture near your body.
  • Take showers instead of baths.
  • Eat healthy. Use less-processed food items, and avoid caffeine, sugar and alcohol, which can raise the pH of your urine and create opportunities for bacteria to grow.
  • Drink Uqora to help flush out bad bacteria and fight off UTIs.
  • Post-menopausal women might have hormonal changes that increase the risk of UTIs.

The Link Between Sex and UTIs

If you’re asking, “can douching cause UTI?” or “do condoms prevent UTI?” you’re not alone. Intercourse can increase the risk for a UTI, because bacteria can be transmitted during sex to the urinary system, allowing infections to begin. Sex itself isn’t the culprit. It’s the bacteria on the skin that gets into the urethra that causes UTIs.

Sex itself does increase the risk of developing UTIs, and there are other elements (like condoms, for example) that might complicate things even more. Whether or not condoms prevent UTIs is complicated. Spermicide-coated condoms can make the vagina more susceptible to E. coli bacteria, which causes UTIs. Unlubricated condoms can irritate the genitals, causing inflammation in the bladder. This makes it easier for bacteria to grow, causing a UTI. Research is, however, limited, and it seems like the vast majority of condoms do not increase the risk of UTIs. If you have frequent UTIs and use condoms, talk to your doctor about your concerns.

Douching can upset the bacteria in the vagina, which can lead to UTIs. The more often you douche, the more likely you are to get a UTI. If you’re prone to UTIs, avoid douching, but an occasional douche shouldn’t cause a UTI.

When You Have a UTI

If you have a UTI, get to the doctor for treatment. Antibiotics are required to get rid of the infection. Drinks lots of water and empty your bladder frequently. Additionally, you may want to use probiotics and drink Uqora to help your immune system fight the infection.

Here’s what to avoid when you have a UTI:

  • Avoid sexual intercourse. Sex during a UTI will probably be uncomfortable, but you could also make the infection worse by adding new bacteria to your system. You may want to wait up to two weeks after the infection is cleared up before sexual activity.
  • Avoid artificial sweeteners. Studies have shown that artificial sweeteners make your symptoms worse.
  • Avoid alcohol. Alcohol irritates the bladder, intensifying the infection.
  • Avoid caffeine. Caffeine also irritates the bladder.

Why Not Use Antibiotics as UTI Prevention?

Antibiotics are sometimes recommended when you have recurrent UTIs. Overusing antibiotics isn’t good for your immune system. Bacteria can become drug-resistant. Antibiotics can also upset the good bacteria in your body that prevents yeast infections. There are other options to keep your entire body healthy. Overusing antibiotics has side effects that should be considered before undergoing a regular treatment regimen.

UTIs are one of the great literal and figurative pains in this world, and UTI prevention is at the top of mind for those of us who suffer from frequent UTIs. If you get recurrent UTIs, you’re probably familiar with the vague stinging and itching that signals the start of a UTI. The next 4 hours are probably spent frantically trying to get ahold of your doctor, followed by a visit to the pharmacist and the long hours between the time you take your first antibiotic and the pain begins to subside.

What can you do to get ahead of UTIs:

UTIs are thankfully very easily treated by antibiotics, but what do you do if you’re someone who wants to be proactive instead of reactive? UTI prevention will be more difficult for some people who are naturally more prone to UTIs. However, no matter what your propensity is, there are a handful of things you can do to prevent UTIs.

There are a handful of ways you can help your body boost its natural defenses against urinary tract infections:

  • Stay well hydrated. Urination is your body’s best natural defense against UTIs, and the better hydrated you are the better your body can fend for itself. 
  • Urinate immediately and fully — don’t hold it in. Go to the bathroom regularly and flush bad bacteria out of your urinary tract. Make sure you completely emptied your bladder and clean from front to back.
  • Avoid baths if you’re especially prone to UTIs and opt for showers instead.
  • Urinate soon after having sex to flush out bacteria.
  • Wear cotton underwear for maximum breathability. 
  • Evaluate your birth control options if you’re suffering from repeat UTIs. Diaphragm, unlubricated condoms or spermicidal jelly for contraception may increase the risk of developing a UTI.
  • Try to avoid or dramatically limit consuming items which increase your bladder pH. This includes sugar, processed and pre-packaged ready-made items, caffeine, alcohol, dairy products, red meat and other animal protein, fish, lots of corn, wheat, and potatoes.
  • If you are post-menopausal, speak with your physician about how your hormonal changes could be impacting your risk of UTIs. Some physicians recommend estrogen supplements to help.
  • Take the over-the-counter supplement, Uqora, a simple drink mix that can help you fight off bacteria and improve urinary health when you need it most, like after sex or prolonged exercise. Uqora’s active ingredients help hinder bacteria from adhering to the urethral wall. Uqora also helps you flush out bacteria quickly and supports the immune system with fighting off UTI’s. 

    Implications of using antibiotics for UTI prevention

    Physicians often recommend using antibiotics to prevent UTIs, not just treat them. It is worth noting that while prophylactic antibiotics are effective in staving off UTIs, using antibiotics to prevent UTIs can have serious drawbacks.


    For one, while antibiotics do strip our body of the bad bacteria that can cause UTIs, they also strip our body of the good bacteria we need to keep a balanced vagina. Without the good bacteria, yeast infections can more easily set in.

    Additionally, while antibiotics kill almost all the bacteria in question, it doesn’t always kill all the bacteria. When some bacteria is able to survive antibiotics, that bacteria develops resistance to the drug. As the resistant bacteria reproduces, they give rise to new populations that are similarly resistant. Pretty soon, that bacteria could have given rise to entire generations of antibiotic resistant bacteria.

    So while antibiotics are certainly a tempting UTI prevention method for someone who repeatedly suffers from UTIs, it is worth noting that overusing antibiotics comes with potential risk and side effects.