Recurrent UTIs

Understanding recurrent / chronic UTIs means understanding how they happen and how one UTI can lead to a chronic battle. Recurrent UTIs are different than acute UTIs and should be considered a unique issue. Here, we discuss topics related to recurrent UTIs and the research leading to new insights into how they work.

Recurrent UTIs as a possible explanation for Interstitial Cystitis


Recurrent UTIs in Postmenopausal Women


The Difference Between UTIs and Recurrent UTIs


UTI research milestones - and future research needed


Recurrent UTIs

Understanding recurrent / chronic UTIs means understanding how they happen and how one UTI can lead to a chronic battle. Recurrent UTIs are different than acute UTIs and should be considered a unique issue. Here, we discuss topics related to recurrent UTIs and the research leading to new insights into how they work.

Recurrent UTIs as a possible explanation for Interstitial Cystitis

Recurrent UTIs in Postmenopausal Women

UTI research milestones - and future research needed

The Difference Between UTIs and Recurrent UTIs

Urinary Tract Infection Tests - what they are and what they mean (or don't mean)

Biofilms and their role in recurrent UTIs

Too many UTIs - an overview of recurrent UTIs and how to manage them

The 3 components everyone should know about recurrent UTIs

UTIs and mental health explained by four mental health scientists

My journey with IC

By Crystal Liu

5 tips for talking to your partner about UTIs

Urinary Tract Infection Tests - what they are and what they mean (or don't mean)


Biofilms and their role in recurrent UTIs


Too many UTIs - an overview of recurrent UTIs and how to manage them


The 3 components everyone should know about recurrent UTIs


UTIs and mental health explained by four mental health scientists


My journey with IC

By Crystal Liu

5 tips for talking to your partner about UTIs


Recurrent UTIs are a big problem. About 25% of women who get a UTI will go on to battle chronic infections. In 2019, the New York Times said that UTIs are “the single biggest risk to healthy people from drug-resistant germs.” With ~80% of all UTIs being relapse infections, meaning a UTI caused by the same bacteria as a previous infection, but were never fully killed off, recurrent UTIs account for the vast majority of antibiotics use. That means the individuals suffering from recurrent UTIs are taking the lion’s share, going through numerous courses of antibiotics per year and may even be taking antibiotics prophylactically on an ongoing basis for prevention.

Without new treatments, these UTIs will become even harder to manage. Increased antibiotics use means increased rates of antibiotic resistance. As some of those drugs start to fail, resistance rates to the others will speed up. An estimated 20%-33% of E. coli strains causing UTIs are resistant to common antibiotics like Bactrim or Cipro. As it stands today, we do not have effective treatments for recurring UTIs. Other than experts on the fringes pushing and innovating on recurrent UTI management, we are primarily dealing with each recurring UTI as if it were in isolation, with the same antibiotics round after round until they stop working.

Effectively, recurrent UTIs are a different disease than acute UTIs, and recurrent UTI treatment and management should reflect that. Unfortunately, we are still in the early days of making progress on this disease. Recurrent UTIs can be defined by persistent bacterial populations in the urinary tract protected by biofilm and present within dormant communities within our cells. The populations survive the immune system and treatment with antibiotics and opportunistically replicate, grow in numbers, and cause “new” infections. Here, you can learn more about biofilms and more.

In the Recurrent UTI section of Uqora’s UTI Learning Center, we discuss topics related to how recurrent UTIs happen, what factors contribute to their development, the nuances of more complicated recurrent UTIs, Interstitial Cystitis, and more. Our founder, Jenna Ryan, was a recurrent UTI sufferer and it is something we’re extremely passionate about at Uqora. We hope that with more information about what’s happening underneath that makes recurrent UTIs different from acute or one-off UTIs, people can better understand their situation and path forward.

In this section, we go over the mechanism of how recurrent UTIs happen and the most recent research on the topic. It is meant to be educational but not directly actionable or contain medical advice. In our sections on UTI Treatment and UTI Causes, we provide more content from a healthcare practitioners, like urogynecologists and urologists, where they provide insight from the perspective of the clinician. Most articles in this section and the section on Vaginal Health and UTIs are written by our co-founder and COO, Spencer Gordon. Spencer’s background is in biochemistry from UC Berkeley and he is constantly staying up to date on new research related to recurrent UTIs and vaginal health. As always, if you have content suggestions that you’re interested in reading more about, please let us know.

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