Here are the pH-acts

2 min read

About the Author

Kate graduated with a B.A. in Journalism from San Diego State University. She is the Content Manager at Uqora and is responsible for Uqora's social media, newsletters and contributing to the UTI Learning Center.

More about this author

About the author

Kate graduated with a B.A. in Journalism from San Diego State University. She is the Content Manager at Uqora and is responsible for Uqora's social media, newsletters and contributing to the UTI Learning Center.

More about this author

Vaginal pH and urine pH are key factors for maintaining optimum urinary health.

Let’s start with the basics: the pH of something indicates how acidic or basic something is. A low pH is acidic, and a high pH is basic or alkaline. Different parts of the body have different ideal pH levels, and if they are off from their typical range, problems can ensue.

pH is measured on a scale from 0 to 14, with 7 being neutral. This scale is logarithmic, which means a pH of 5, for instance, is 10x more acidic than a pH of 6!

Vaginal pH is moderately acidic. A healthy vaginal pH falls between 3.8 and 4.5. This is because good bacteria in the vagina, like lactobacillus, release acids. Urine pH is also acidic, with a typical pH of around 5 to 6.

Normal urine pH falls within the range of 5-6, which is more acidic than pure water (neutral pH of 7).


Urine pH:

The normal range for urine pH is between 5 and 6. The higher the number, the more basic (alkaline) it is. The lower the number, the more acidic.

It’s important to be mindful of your urine pH because acidic urine can cause irritation. One of the ways acidic urine can be avoided is by monitoring the foods you eat. A diet with more fruits and vegetables is more likely to have alkaline urine.

Good bacteria in the vagina, like lactobacillus, release acids that keep the vaginal pH low (more acidic).


Vaginal pH:

A healthy vaginal pH is moderately acidic, with pH between 3.8 and 4.5. The vagina houses an array of lactobacilli strains that promote healthy vaginal pH. Some of these important strains are Lactobacillus Rhamnosus, Lactobacillus Reuteri and Lactobacillus Acidophilus. These bacteria eat the glycogen found in vaginal mucus. In exchange, they produce lactic acid and hydrogen peroxide, which lower pH. Ever wonder why your underwear gets those tiny bleached out patches? This process is the reason!

The lactic acid and hydrogen peroxide byproducts make the vagina moderately acidic, which inhibits the growth of harmful bacteria and yeast.

When your pH balance is off, that means lactobacilli levels are low and can’t keep opportunistic pathogens in check, potentially allowing harmful bacteria to flourish and colonize the vagina.

To balance your vaginal pH a few tips include considering a vaginal probiotic to restore lactobacilli levels, eating probiotic-rich foods like kombucha and yogurt, and avoiding any scented feminine hygiene products.


Spin to win