How To Treat A UTI

Treatment and management of chronic and recurring UTIs isn't always straightforward. Nuance is important when it comes to treating UTIs with antibiotics. Here, Dr. Carrie Aisen, one of Uqora's medical advisors and San Diego-based urologist, shares insight on how she approaches recurrent UTIs in her patients.

 

The most common UTI questions that my patients ask me

 

The Need for an Alternative to Antibiotics for Recurrent UTIs

 

Are antibiotics for an uncomplicated UTI always necessary?

Antibiotic Awareness is Key to Stopping Superbugs

Exploring the evidence behind antibiotic alternatives for recurrent UTIs

The increasing threat of antibiotic resistance

How To Treat A UTI

Treatment and management of chronic and recurring UTIs isn't always straightforward. Nuance is important when it comes to treating UTIs with antibiotics. Here, Dr. Carrie Aisen, one of Uqora's medical advisors and San Diego-based urologist, shares insight on how she approaches recurrent UTIs in her patients.

The most common UTI questions that my patients ask me

The Need for an Alternative to Antibiotics for Recurrent UTIs

Are antibiotics for an uncomplicated UTI always necessary?

Antibiotic Awareness is Key to Stopping Suberbugs

Exploring the evidence behind antibiotic alternatives for recurrent UTIs

The increasing threat of antibiotic resistance

On the surface, how to treat a UTI appears fairly simple. For an acute UTI, an individual can purchase an over-the-counter, at-home UTI test, and if positive and he or she wishes to treat it, contact a doctor to schedule an appointment or take a visit to urgent care or similar. Once the prescription is filled, a quick course of antibiotics will typically clear up UTI symptoms in 24 to 48 hours.

However, there are many variations and possible complexities to consider. For instance, the growth in telemedicine had made it substantially easier to connect with a physician and receive a prescription for antibiotic treatment without stepping foot in a doctor‘s office or clinic. New telemedicine platforms use screening surveys, chat/ text, and/ or video conferencing to diagnose the patient. A shortcoming is that many of these faster, easier routes to treatment do not request additional diagnosing evidence, such as a urine culture.

Urine cultures are currently the gold-standard for diagnosis that leads to the most effective and responsible UTI treatment. Many telemedicine platforms do not require UTI test strips or urine cultures to prescribe antibiotics. The risk of this approach is that UTIs may be overtreated because there is no infection or there is an infection from an atypical pathogen. You can find more information about UTI tests and what they mean.

Ideally, for treatment of any bacterial infection, the antibiotic that is chosen should be as targeted as possible to the infecting bacteria. This reduces the amount of disruption to other bacteria that are naturally living within our bodies. When an antibiotic is taken orally for a UTI, it hits the gut and many other tissues before reaching the urine, unloading some of its effect along the way on native bacteria unrelated to the urinary tract infection.

There are also instances in which bacteria are present in the urine, but treatment is not appropriate. In general, we now know the urine is not sterile and there is, in fact, a complex community of microorganisms living naturally in the urine. This varies from person to person and changes as we grow older. A high percentage of elderly women, for example, have asymptomatic bacteriuria, or bacteria in the urine, but no symptoms. Best practice in this case is to periodically monitor the patient, but not treat with antibiotics.

In this section of our UTI Learning Center, we provide information on UTI treatment, with a special focus on content from doctors and other expert healthcare practitioners that provide the perspective from a clinician’s point of view. For instance, in the article above titled “Are Antibiotics for an Uncomplicated UTI Always Necessary”, urologist Dr. Carrie Aisen discusses whether or not all UTIs even need treatment.

Antibiotics must be used responsibly for urinary tract infection treatment. Antibiotic resistance rates, especially for microbes causing UTIs, have never been higher. At Uqora, we believe that. Recurring UTIs need to be thoughtfully managed when it comes to treatment. Here, we hope to provide relevant and helpful information on these topics related to UTI treatment.

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